IT : Chapter Two (2019)

Albeit the creatures are entertaining to watch, however it lacks the manifestation of the scary rituals that should follow. This is the main problem with the IT movies, it is not terrifying nor scary enough to make you have a nightmare. Even sometimes it is laughable due to its unprecedented nature of the creatures’ features.

It is super slow and draggy that it doesn’t need to be at almost 3 hours mark. 2 hours should be the best run time for this movie like IT Chapter One. It has nothing much to talk about especially during the first hour. Reunion, get together, a few jumpscare parts. That’s all there is to it.

The second act of the movie (halfway) feels as if you are watching 5 to 6 different short films instead. Because it has that slow-burning nature, the scenes feel disjointed from one another. It spends around 45 minutes to an hour to look at every members of The Losers’ Club being haunted by Pennywise.

The movie flips in flashbacks between the younger Losers and the grownups they’ve become (Jessica Chastain, James McAvoy, Jay Ryan, Bill Hader, Isaiah Mustafa, James Ransone and Andy Bean), and sometimes even pairs them together in the same scenes.

Bill Skarsgård returns as Pennywise, the super-nasty sewer dweller who definitely throws the nightmare needle into the red. He can shape-shift into just about anything, and his mouth is a maw of teeth just waiting to pounce—especially on cherubic children. Wanting to hire entertainment for your kid’s birthday party? Pennywise has ruined that gig for clowns. Get a bounce house and fill it with snakes, or hire a drunken knife thrower instead. You’ll feel so much safer.

And speaking of everyone else in Derry, where are they? The streets are always deserted. Maybe Pennywise ate everyone. I think the movie must not have had much budget for hiring extras after spending so much for CGI, including “de-aging” the young actors, shaving off a few crucial growth years to get them back to looking like the fresh-faced early teens they were when making the first movie in 2016.

But this is it, supposedly, for It. At least that’s what the poster and the movie promos say. And It goes out with a bang—full of strangeness and suspense, a jack-in-the-box of jolts and jumps, oozing and clattering and shrieking with freak-show, gross-out, goose-bump weirdness, giving the ol’ heartstrings a sentimental tug while it cranks out hair-raising, FX terrors.

And all in all, two hours and 49 minutes, 27 years and a bunch of scares later, it’s a good ending for a bad—a very, very, very bad—clown.

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